Stop Stretching Your Insertional Tendinopathy!

Lack of stretching can cause injury, and often people think the cure for that injury is to stretch it out. Well, I am here to tell you that not all injuries benefit from stretching. In fact, some are actually made a lot worse by stretching.

Insertional tendinopathy is one example of an injury that is worse off with stretching.

What is Insertional Tendinopathy?

Tendinopathy is an umbrella term for the various types of injury that can affect a tendon, including inflammation and degeneration, and is characterised by pain. A typical presentation of tendinopathy is pain felt in the initiation of loading, such as when you start to run or squat.

Tendon load does not solely come from tension, but there is also an important concept of compression that is often not fully explained.

A good example of a tendon that is compressed is the Achilles. As the Achilles attaches to the heel bone it curves around the edge of the heel (imagine a rope on a pulley curving around a wheel).

Let’s look at the following analogy to help explain. I once towed an old farm car with a tractor, and the rope I used came at a high angle from the back of the tractor down to the front of the car, curved under the bumper and onto the axle where I tied it on. After pulling the car for about 10m the rope snapped, not in the middle of the rope, but where the rope curved under the bumper. The rope had worn itself by rubbing on the bumper.

The compressive load in this scenario is the rope pressing on the bumper of the car. Putting pressure on a rope as it is pulled by the tractor, pulls on the resistance of the car. This is a similar example to how tendons like the achilles, hamstrings and gluteals can compress on bones which they wrap around as they come into their attachment point. Usually the tendon is at a slightly differing angle to their line of force at its attachment as it is compressed around a bone.

Insertional tendinopathy is irritation of the tendon where it attaches onto the bone, which is where the compression occurs. It is characteristically different to the other form of tendinopathy in that the pain source is not in the middle of the tendon, but where the tendon attaches to the bone (at its insertion).

For years, we have been managing insertional tendinopathy through stretches and exercises, often with varied results. The more severe the tendinopathy, the less likely stretching would help. In fact, stretching results in further compression of the tendon at the irritation point, which actually worsens the pain.

For more information on exercises that help improve an insertional tendinopathy see our blog on Achilles Tendinopathy.

If you would like a review of your insertional tendinopathy management come and one of our Physio’s at Bend + Mend. We have three convenient locations in Sydney’s CBD.

Campbell Hooker

About Campbell Hooker

Campbell Graduated from AUT University and has worked in private practice in both Australia and in London. Campbell has a keen interest in sporting injuries, office based injuries and the neck. He has worked at grassroots and elite levels of rugby union and league, and with surf lifesaving. He has recently taken to triathlon where he spends most of his spare time. Campbell has an interest in neurological conditions and has a Neuroanatomy degree out of Otago University. He utilises a number of methods when both analysing and treating patients, including dry needling and the Sarah Key Method.

18 Comments

  • Avatar Ian Wallace says:

    Hi Campbell,
    Thank you so much for this article: “Stop Stretching Your Insertional Tendinopathy!
    I’ve had heel pain in my right heel for over 5 months without being able to have much improvement. I was told by my Podiatrist I had plantar faciitis and he sold me expensive orthotics for $650 Cdn, which I wore for 2 months with no improvement, and stopped using them. And he said to do stretching & strength exercises. Simple weight bearing stretches causes more pain, and could only do certain foot exercises.
    Then I went back to see him, and all he said was I’m getting old and that’s all we can do. My MD said the same things. 🙁
    I figured I had tears in the achillies at the insertion point, because that is where the pain is.
    Finally after 5 months of pain and frustration and minimum physical activity, I was able to get an ultrasound, which indicated I have calcium deposits on the achillies. I’ve also been having shoulder pain indicating possible rotator cuff tears. It turns out I also have no tears, but do have calcium deposits there as well.
    In all my searching on the internet, your explanation re: Stop Stretching Your Insertional Tendinopathy made the most sense regarding my issues. And in all my searching for heel pain I had not found anything mentioning calcium deposits…
    So, I just wanted to thank you for your article and info, and as I wasn’t able to find any info on your site re: calcium deposits/calcific tendonitis prognosis, treatments, stretches & exercises. Maybe I just wasn’t able to look in the proper area?

    Hope you guys down south get a handle on the Covid 19 problems there. Stay safe.
    Cheers from Canada!
    ian wallace
    Live for today, hope for tomorrow.

    • Avatar Phyllis Murdock says:

      Ian you may want to look into a procedure called percutaneous needle aspiration and lavage. It is used for calcific tendinitis.
      Phyllis Murdock
      (I have the calcium deposits in my achilles too!)

    • Avatar Ronald Finnigan says:

      Ian
      I also suffered from PF for 18 months. Walking cast, splint at night, walker, all the devices to no avail. What worked for me was laser therapy. After the 4th of 6 treatments, I could walk 2 miles with very little pain. Today, I walk 5 miles, six days per week. Pain is minimal. Good luck.

  • Avatar Ace says:

    Hi im 18 years old male and I have golfers elbow on both elbows I think it’s because of long hours on computer. I have it for 2 months but i rested it for about a month now. What can I do? Can I strengthen it?

    • Hi Ace,
      Thank you for your question.
      Like all injuries the most important aspect is making sure you have an accurate diagnosis. Golfers elbow is a broad diagnosis and includes a number of structures. You are correct to assume strengthening may help with a tendon injury, but there are many different structures that could cause elbow pain, especially when you have it on both sides.
      Once you have an accurate diagnosis, lets assume you do have tendon pain, you need to modify the loading on the elbow. Too much and you are going to hurt it, too little and you wont help the elbow mend itself. It is a balancing act that often is best guided by a physiotherapist.
      If you are in Sydney it would be great to see you in clinic and review your elbow pain. We do offer Online Telehealth consultations if you are outside of Sydney also.
      Please reach out if I can help further.
      Kind regards,
      Campbell

      • Avatar Lorna Borg says:

        Hi Campbell I’m in Europe Malta. I have the same problem tennis elbow with pain on the outside of the elbow and recently radiating to shoulder . Its caused by a recent change in job requiring mouse use pc work, which started in Aug and inset of pain in October and treatment starting now in jan 2021. I have now started to immobilize the wrist for 3.weeks . 1st week 24 hours 2nd week 12 hours and 3rd week random use of this wrist immobiliser. I wasnt given any tips for exercises. The immobiliser has reduced the pain on lifting that started radiating to shoulder. Sadly its my dominant hand. Should I apply heat and cold. I practice yoga daily and with the sun salutations I do not have any pain without the wrist immobiliser. I dont want this for life . Any tips pls

        • Hello Lorna,
          Your injury sounds quite typical of something I would expect from a shoulder or a neck pathology instead of tennis elbow or wrist pain. I would advise a second opinion for an accurate diagnosis before proceeding with any treatment intervention. If you are satisfied with your diagnosis then continue with your treatment. In my opinion heat vs ice should be based on which one helps your pain more, there is some conflicting evidence to suggest one vs the other. You may also wish to revise how much exercise and what type of exercises you are doing for your injury.
          If you have access to an experienced clinician there is a lot to gain from reviewing movement tests. Alternatively we offer Telehealth consults with all of our experienced clinicians.
          Thanks for reaching out!
          Kind regards,
          Campbell

  • Avatar Jodi says:

    I have severe tendonitis in both achilles tendons (started 6 months ago) i cant really bend at the ankle without horrible pain. Three days ago my knee started hurting to bend while walking. Thinking my legs were just tired i let it go. Today the pain is horrible and i noticed my tendon like my achilles is super tight. I have fibromyalgia can this be causing my tendons to tighten so severely?

    • Hi Jodi,

      It sounds like a frustrating position to be in. I’m sorry to hear about your pain over the past 6 months. I think it would be wise to assess your Fibromyalgia as a potential contributor to your pain presentation. Although it is difficult to make an assumption without seeing you in clinic.

      If you are in Sydney it would be great to see you in the clinic. We also offer Telehealth consultations if you are unable to come in.

      Thanks for reaching out Jodi!
      Kind regards,
      Campbell

  • Avatar Cynthia says:

    All the results I can find for the knee refer to patellar tendonitis but my pain concentrates on the rear, outer side of my right knee where the fibula attaches (Lateral collateral tendon?) what do I do for fairly debilitating pain, stiffness & weakness that came on suddenly with no injury?

    • Thank you for your question Cynthia. This sounds like an unpleasant knee indeed. If this pain has come on quite strongly with no indication or injury I would suggest getting this seen to at a local medical practice. There are a number of different things that could cause your pain but when they don’t have a mechanical cause or mechanism of injury we consider other causes. I would consider following this pain up with your medical practitioner, at least for peace of mind to start with, and then moving on to a Physio for further assessment and treatment.

      Thank you for reaching out Cynthia!

  • Avatar Michael Schaefer says:

    Hello , Mr Hooker
    I have been battling what was thought to be Sciatica but now think it’s Chronic Hamstring Tendinopathy. Have had an MRI and there are Calcium Deposits”Bone Spurs” on my sit bone. Dr. Says that there is no tear in the tendon from the said Calcium Deposits but when I sit, it still is causing me all kinds of pain. Do you think that those “Bone Spurs” need to come off? Should I seek another Doctors opinion? I’m desperate and can’t take this pain anymore. Thank you for listening and any advice would greatly be appreciated!

    • Hi Michael,
      Thank you for your question. Sitting pain is not nice, especially if you have an office job. My opinion is always the same when it comes to this type of pain. Make sure you have an accurate diagnosis before proceeding with any treatment intervention. Pain in this region might still be attributable to your lower back, or to the bone spur or something else altogether. The MRI is a handy tool to help us confirm diagnosis but it still has its limitations, for example, the image doesn’t show your pain relationship with sitting. Make sure you are adamant your pain is due to your spurs before proceeding further!
      If you would like a second opinion I would always recommend a review with an experienced clinician. If you are in the Sydney region then we have 4 convenient locations in the CBD or offer Telehealth consults online.
      Thanks again for your comment!

  • Avatar Charlotte Davison says:

    Hi,
    I am a 21 year old female and have been having a mild ache in the back of my calf I have been reading up on Dr. Google and it has put all sorts in my mind, I have come to the conclusion it may be something to do with my tendon as I tend to do a lot of running however over the Christmas break I did stop for a while ans have just started it back up?

    • Hi Charlotte,
      Thanks for your comment. It is frustrating to have pain limiting something we take for granted, you are definitely not alone! Dr Google has a great way of helping broaden our horizons on potential underlying pain contributors. I would always take this approach with a grain of salt. My opinion is always the same when it comes to this type of pain. Make sure you have an accurate diagnosis before proceeding with any treatment intervention. If you are satisfied with your diagnosis then treatment may involve some kind of load modification approach – changing what you do, how much you do it and making sure you don’t over do it. It can be a tricky balancing act. If you would like some guidance on how to manage your calf and are in the Sydney region then we have 4 convenient locations or offer Telehealth consults online as well.

      Thanks again for your comment!

  • Avatar Ardit says:

    Hi!
    Very informative article! I’ve been struggling for a year now from left iliopsoas tendinitis ( the diagnose was just confirmed by MRI, left iliopsoas tendon thickness), which was caused after a strain during soccer game. I have stopped workout/sports activities and have been resting for the last 3 weeks. I have felt some minor improvements in pain however still feel contracted in the area. I would really appreciate you suggestion weather I should start stretching, doing issometric strengthening contraction or give it some more rest?

    Thank you in advance!

    • Hi Ardit,
      This is a particularly interesting diagnosis as it is quite rare. In my opinion this may either 3 things. Firstly, it may be an injury in conjunction with other pathology. In this instance I would suggest reviewing particularly your lumbar spine, hips and muscles of the core and leg to see any contributing factors. Secondly it may be that the injury is isolated to the Iliopsoas and this has not had proper addressing and has therefore become what is called a tendinopathy. Again, I think this is quite rare but for this injury we need to consider load management approach – exercise the muscle but not over doing it! Thirdly, it maybe that the MRI has detected a thickened tendon as an incidental finding, not necessarily contributing to your pain experience. This is quite common, MRI’s are now more sensitive, sometimes what they detect are not the pain source.
      Seeing a skilled Physio clinician is going to provide the most benefit for you, your priority is to be absolutely sure your diagnosis is accurate!
      If you are in Sydney I would love to review your hip pain. We also offer Telehealth consultations for people outside of Sydney.
      Thanks for your question!
      Kind regards,
      Campbell

  • Avatar Lena Noel says:

    Hello!
    I haven’t been diagnosed with tendinitis, but I suspect it due to the recurring pain I’ve had in my left leg for a couple years. It first happened when I over-extended my leg and I felt a stretching sensation behind my knee. The pain can go away for months but it returns in the same spot. I believe I’ve injured one of my hamstring muscles just above the knee. I wanted to ask if rolling out my calf and hamstring muscles can be helpful instead of stretching after a jog. Unfortunately not jogging isn’t really an option for me, and I work long shifts on a job that I spend a lot of time on my feet on.

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